Rolled Biscuits

If you have never had homemade rolled biscuits, baby, you’re gonna need to remedy that soon.

I’m going to assume that you have had rolled biscuits in your lifetime.

I’m going to assume you have a sweet granny or a Southern mom that has made these for you many many many times in your life.

Rolled Biscuits + Grandboo Help = Delish

Lawsy, pass the cream gravy or homemade apple butter!

If you’ve never ever had a rolled biscuit, I feel like I need to give you a warm hug.

Mostly cause I think I might faint and I don’t want to fall over.

~ the vapors – I haves them ~

What is a rolled biscuit?

By definition, it’s biscuit dough, kneaded a bit, rolled out, cut, and baked to the above photo’s flaky perfection.

Where I grew up (West Texas), Southern biscuits and gravy is a thang, an every day kinda thang.

Not once have I taken that blessing for granted.

NOT ONCE!

Since I live in the South, you would think my go-to biscuit recipe would be from Paula Deen or maybe one passed down in my family.

Nope on both counts.

#1: The best biscuit recipe I have found, comes from the Joy of Cooking.

#2: The German (my mother) is not Southern, and I never once saw her make rolled biscuits.

#3: I am a born and raised Southerner, so I took it upon myself to find the very best recipe as a nod to those roots and to start my own family tradition of enjoying biscuits and gravy as much as possible.

The delicious tradition of this light and flaky biscuit recipe, lives on through my son and Sweet E.

I love a recipe that can bring parents, grandparents, children, and grandchildren (your grandboo!) together in the kitchen.

Baking has a way of bringing a family together.

If you have an itty bitty that wants to help in the kitchen, rolled biscuits are a great place to start.

You do the messiest part of the mixing, then let them get their hands on the dough to help.

When it comes to rolling out the biscuits, you can get things started, then let them take a turn.

The rolling pin is the best part (other than the slathering with butter part)!

After that, it’s simple cutting and placing on a cookie sheet to bake.

Great memories are made with the bonus of something mouth watering to eat at the end.

These rolled biscuits are worth making and can hold everything from turkey or ham slices to peanut butter and jelly, and maybe some cream gravy for the grownups.

They seem delicate and easily brought asunder by toppings or fillings, but I assure you they can take all the filling or smothering you want to throw at ’em.

Aren’t they magnificent?

rolled biscuit

Before you get started, know the absolute trick to producing so many unforgettable layers of yum is DO NOT OVER-MIX THE DOUGH. 

You’re gonna wanna. 

You’re gonna see the unincorporated butter and think you must mix just a little bit more. 

DON’T DO IT!

Use a light hand, baby.

Heads up: at the end of the post, there is a printable version of the recipe.

Let’s get to it!

Rolled Biscuits

Yield: Makes 20 2-inch biscuits (don’t believe it – go ahead and double this bad boy)

Ingredients:

2 cups all purpose flour

2 1/2 tsp baking powder

1/2 to 3/4 tsp salt

3/4 cup of milk

5-6 tbsp cold butter

Instructions:

1: Position a rack in the center of the oven.

2: Preheat the oven to 450°.

3: Have a large ungreased baking sheet ready.

4: Whisk flour, baking powder and salt thoroughly into a large bowl.

5: Drop in 5-6 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces. (I use all of 6 tbsp)

6: Cut in the butter with a pastry blender (I use a large fork…easier to handle), tossing the pieces with the flour mixture to coat and separate them as you work.

7: For biscuits with crunchy edges and a flaky, layered, texture, continue to cut in the butter until the largest pieces are the size of peas and the rest resemble bread crumbs.

8: For classic fluffy biscuits, continue to cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs. Do not allow the butter to melt or or form a paste with the flour.

9: Add all at once: 3/4 cup of milk and mix with a rubber spatula, wooden spoon, or fork just until most of the dry ingredients are moistened.

10: With a lightly floured hand, gather the dough into a ball and knead it gently against the sides and bottom of the bowl 5 to 10 times, turning and pressing any loose pieces into the dough each time until they adhere and the bowl is fairly clean.

11: To shape round biscuits: Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface. ( I use a silicone mat for ease) With a lightly floured rolling pin, or your fingers, roll out or pat the dough until 1/2 inch thick.

12: Cut out 1 3/4- to 2-inch rounds with a drinking glass or biscuit cutter dipped in flour; push the cutter straight down into the dough and pull it out without twisting for biscuits that will rise evenly. You can re-roll the scraps and cut additional biscuits, but be forewarned, they are never as tender as the first cut.

13: At this point you can freeze the biscuit rounds, if you’d like.

14: For browner tops, you can brush the biscuit tops with milk or melted butter.

15: Place the biscuits on a baking sheet at least 1 inch apart for biscuits with crusty sides or close together for biscuits that are joined and remain soft on the sides.

16: Bake until the biscuits are golden brown on the top and a deeper golden brown on the bottom, 10-12 minutes.

Serve hot

Notes:

1: Why cold butter? The most important reason is that the relatively large particles of cold butter leave air pockets when they melt during baking.

The result? A flaky, not crumbly, final product.

2: I always double the batch. You can freeze the biscuits you don’t use.

A gentle reminder: OMT! uses Amazon referral links at no cost to you!

3: Using parchment paper when cooking the biscuits makes for easy clean-up (I’ve linked the kind I use in the printable recipe).

4: Just for fun, I also linked a few products that you might need, one of which is my favorite: a tapered rolling pin.

Have you used one before? They are so zippy and easy to use. I love mine!

5:  Need ideas on what to pair the biscuits with? How about under a river of cream gravy? Or slathered with butter and jam? Or dipped in honey?

From: The Joy of Cooking

Rolled Biscuits

Rolled biscuits are about as Southern as it gets.

Passing down the tradition of baking and eating together, whether it’s with your kiddos or your grandkids, is true memories in the making.

It’s about as good as it gets, baby.

I hope you’ve had the joy of eating them your entire life. If you haven’t – there’s no time like RIGHT NOW! to remedy that oversight.

If you missed it the first time, here’s the link for how to make cream gravy in three simple steps (so simple!).

Go on.

Get to making memories with those you love.

Happy Baking! Happy Eating!

Rolled Biscuits

Rolled Biscuits

Yield: 20 biscuits
Prep Time: 20 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

These rolled biscuits are light and flaky, yet can take all the filling or smothering you want to throw at 'em.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 to 3/4 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup of milk
  • 5-6 tbsp cold butter

Instructions

Position a rack in the center of the oven.

Preheat the oven to 450°.

Have a large ungreased baking sheet ready.

Whisk flour, baking powder and salt thoroughly into a large bowl.

Drop in 5-6 tbsp cold unsalted butter, cut into pieces. ( I use all of 6 tbsp)

Cut in the butter with a pastry blender (I use a large fork…easier to handle), tossing the pieces with the flour mixture to coat and separate them as you work.

For biscuits with crunchy edges and a flaky, layered, texture, continue to cut in the butter until the largest pieces are the size of peas and the rest resemble bread crumbs.

For classic fluffy biscuits, continue to cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse bread crumbs. Do not allow the butter to melt or or form a paste with the flour.

Add all at once: 3/4 cup of milk and mix with a rubber spatula, wooden spoon, or fork just until most of the dry ingredients are moistened.

With a lightly floured hand, gather the dough into a ball and knead it gently against the sides and bottom of the bowl 5 to 10 times, turning and pressing any loose pieces into the dough each time until they adhere and the bowl is fairly clean.

To shape round biscuits: Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface. (I use a silicone mat for ease) With a lightly floured rolling pin, or your fingers, roll out or pat the dough until 1/2 inch thick.

Cut out 1 3/4- to 2-inch rounds with a drinking glass or biscuit cutter dipped in flour; push the cutter straight down into the dough and pull it out without twisting for biscuits that will rise evenly. You can re-roll the scraps and cut additional biscuits, but be forewarned, they are never as tender as the first cut.

At this point you can freeze the biscuit rounds, if you’d like.

For browner tops, you can brush the biscuit tops with milk or melted butter.

Place the biscuits on a baking sheet at least 1 inch apart for biscuits with crusty sides or close together for biscuits that are joined and remain soft on the sides.

Bake until the biscuits are golden brown on the top and a deeper golden brown on the bottom, 10-12 minutes.

Serve hot

Notes

Why cold butter?

The most important reason is that the relatively large particles of cold butter leave air pockets when they melt during baking.

The result?

A flaky, not crumbly, final product.


Nutrition Information:
Yield: 10 Serving Size: 2 biscuit
Amount Per Serving:Calories: 406 Total Fat: 35g Saturated Fat: 22g Trans Fat: 1g Unsaturated Fat: 10g Cholesterol: 93mg Sodium: 493mg Carbohydrates: 20g Fiber: 1g Sugar: 0g Protein: 4g
Nutrition information isn’t always accurate.

Original post: December 10, 2012. Updated Post: April 21, 2019

 

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Rest yer weary fingers.

Except to click on the image.

You still have enough strength for that.

COME ON!

YOU CAN DO IT!

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Comments

  1. Felt like I was sitting in the kitchen with a truly talented cook that made everything fun. In two days I will have a proper rolling pin to replace the two I have not been able to find and some biscuit cutters which I will apparently need if I make real biscuits and not just crack open a can of P*bury.

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